Monitoring Wireless Capacity

In my last post,  http://wp.me/ps6Jj-am I talked about wireless network challenges, what to look for and how to plan properly for a deployment. I talked about planning for capacity to ensure you don’t go over a certain number of users per AP.

So, the next challenge becomes, how do I ensure that as I grow I don’t begin to exceed the optimal number of users per AP.

This is where advanced network monitoring can help mitigate issues before they become a problem. In the past a network monitor would poll or ping an access point to ensure it is available on the network. Although this is helpful it does nothing to monitor capacity.

Capacity planning is critical to any network management system. Bandwidth, CPU and Memory needs to be monitored on all your network devices. Each configured with a baseline that will alert you when that baseline is exceeded.

Recently we added some new capabilities to our Network Management System to cover Wireless Capacity Monitoring. Our monitors allow me to set the number of associated users threshold to the number of my choosing, either per AP, per Controller or any combination thereof. If the threshold is reached I can either send an email, log, open a ticket in our system, run a WEB service to another system, run a SPROC or do any combination of the above.

For our customers this will ensure a positive wireless experience. For us, it will help cut down on calls to our NOC regarding wireless performance issues, because we will be dealing with them before they become an issue.

This kind of monitoring is critical in less static environments like boardrooms, public areas with guest access and retail environments. In static environments where you know the number of users it may be less critical, but as users may move around, change their daily patterns, or over time you hire more staff, these changes can overload one AP, affecting the user experience and possibly productivity.

Setting all of this monitoring up may be time consuming in the short term, but can save you hours and hours of troubleshooting in the future.

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